…"/>

Taking control of the youth’s computer literacy

Lucky Lerefolo, the executive director of the Tlokwe Youth Centre for Excellence (TYCE) is doing fantastic work as a computer literacy lecturer at the centre's computer lab.

What was once a jail has now turned into a space of opportunity for the community’s born-free generation at the Tlokwe Youth Centre for Excellence.

At the forefront of this turnaround is the centre’s computer labs and their enthusiastic and knowledgeable lecturer, Lucky Lerefolo, who provides computer literacy courses that can change lives and promote skills in the area.

‘I started about seven years ago but not in the computer lab. I tutored project management and communication then and got this position after the previous tutor left,’ he says.
According to Lucky, there are 20 computers in the lab at the moment,
‘Our qualification is called “End User Computing”. It is a year’s program that caters for project management, MS Office programmes, Internet and email. Our qualification also caters for fundamentals and electives,’ he continues.

Lucky Lerefolo, the executive director of the Tlokwe Youth Centre for Excellence (TYCE) is doing fantastic work as a computer literacy lecturer at the centre's computer lab.

Lucky Lerefolo, the executive director of the Tlokwe Youth Centre for Excellence (TYCE) is doing fantastic work as a computer literacy lecturer at the centre’s computer lab.

Lucky also believes in building a good foundation regarding computer literacy skills.

‘We want to check how good the students are in assessing their skills with the computer’s language. Once they are comfortable with the computer, we assess them and provide different units to test their skills.

We have approximately 33 units in the qualification. We also need to check each student’s speed of learning,’ says Lucky, who is currently the only teacher in the lab.

‘When we have more teachers, we will be able to complete courses in time. Resources are a problem at the moment,’ he admits.

A highlight for him has been the improvement he has witnessed in students who have completed the computer literacy course and have gone on to greater things.
‘Former students are working in the private and public sectors. Some have begun their own businesses and are doing very well,’ says Lucky.
This course at TYCE tries to promote free education as far as possible, with students able to make monthly payments as part of a six-month course.
‘They start off with a R500 registration fee and can then pay the remaining amount over the next six months. We try to be as accessible as possible with this certificate in computer literacy.’
For more information, contact the Tlokwe Youth Centre for Excellence at 018 293 1664

  AUTHOR
Wouter Pienaar
Sport Journalist

Latest News

COMMENTS

Carletonville HeraldParys GazetteSedibeng SterVaal Weekblad
Top